C Tann-Starr's Outside Blog

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Are You A Reliable Source Or An Accident Waiting To Happen?

Are You A Reliable Source Or An Accident Waiting To Happen?

Executive Order 13526, Section I.1(4)(2) states "Classified Information shall not be declassified automatically as a result of any unauthorized disclosure of identical or similar information." The reason why Wikileaks.org was blackballed by the  Commerce Dept appears to be the fact that their "information was neither properly nor improperly "declassified" by the appropriate authority and requires continued classification or reclassification. Please do not attempt to access any of the WikiLeaks documents via the WikiLeaks website or through other websites hosting those documents because these documents may contain classified information."

According to a very interesting government memo to all Commerce Dept employees and contractors, "Accessing the WikiLeaks documents will lead to sanitization of your PC to remove any potentially classified information from the system and result in possible data loss." http://cryptome.org/0003/doc-bans-wl.htm

As bloggers we link back to all sorts of interesting articles and sometimes spew a lot of vehement allegations pro and con when it comes to making a political  point... This is just a heads up to my political friends: be careful who you link to while discussing your political views because you may find yourself embroiled in a treason investigation if you interview the wrong writer as a "featured source" on your blog. Your support of the person giving you an "exclusive scoop" may inadvertently shut down your blog...  Fibbing about contacting someone who allegedly told you something may also get you caught up in their (your sources) government woes, especially if investigators believe your first reporting rather than your hindsight excuse.

 

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Comment balloon 16 commentsC Tann-Starr • December 05 2010 10:00AM

Comments

Good morning C- I think we often forget that just because something has been reported over the internet or in a blog doesn't necessarily make it accurate.  And, as paranoid as it sounds, who wants to get caught up in something that is "guilt by association"  .

Posted by Kathy Streib, Home Stager - Palm Beach County,FL -561-914-6224 (Room Service Home Staging) about 7 years ago

Kathy, I have a lot of government friends and sometimes run errands for them. Confidential information should always remain confidential information until vetted properly. Just because a person stumbles across something doesn't mean he/she/they/we should abuse our ability to engage in free speech. Journalists have editors and magazine/news agencies have protocols and policies for a reason. Freedom of the Press does not mean there will be no consequences if a writer is irresponsible. Of course, irresponsibility is relative... (LOL).    

Posted by C Tann-Starr (Tann Starr & Associates, Inc.) about 7 years ago

It's an interesting perversion of lodgic that government workers and contractors are not alloeed to read and know what everyone else in the world can!

It's ironic that there fathers supported Elsberg and the Baraingan brothers! The idea seems to be dependent on who's being embarrassed!

Bill

Posted by William J. Archambault, Jr. (The Real Estate Investment Institute ) about 7 years ago

I just think that in blogging about real estate it is best to try not to disparage any particular person or group. What is the good of making enemies?

Posted by Marcy Moyer, Probate, Trust, and Investment Specialist (eXp Realty of California Silicon Valley Probate, Trust, and Investment Sales) about 7 years ago

Based on what I've heard on the news and read online, a lot of what has been released on wikileaks of "classified" information is more potentially politically embarrasing than potentially placing national security in jeapordy.

Posted by Jesse Skolkin (Independent New York State Certified Real Estate Appraiser) about 7 years ago

It is my understanding that press aren't the issue... but it would suck to be a government employee.  The "responsible" people in the government don't make much sense. 

Posted by Lane Bailey, Realtor & Car Guy (Century 21 Results Realty) about 7 years ago

Confidential, classified information, regardless of content, should be treated with a healthy dose of respect because in the game of information/disinformation, the release of content before its time can have dire consequences... Releasing bogus information for people to respond/react to can also trigger a positive/negative impact on a lot of economic markets just like an accurate memorandum can.

 

 

Posted by C Tann-Starr (Tann Starr & Associates, Inc.) about 7 years ago

Hi C...I'm surprise and disappointed that more folks didn't respond to this post.  It contains some very important advice. As a former holder of a security clearance and also as a former member of an Ambassador's Team while in Somalia I have a healthy respect for caution when it comes to sensative issues. Would have like to re-blog this.

Kate

Posted by Kate Elim, Realtor 540-226-1964, Selling Homes & Land a (Dockside Realty) about 7 years ago

Kate,  I will check off the re-blog authorization button just for you (LOL). I was an investigator for a Mayoral agency so as a retired government employee I know just how dangerous and bad a breach of security can be. Finding the sources of leaks can run up a serious taxpayer tab. Prosecuting the offenders will cost even more... Then we have to pay to feed, clothe and house them... :-)

Posted by C Tann-Starr (Tann Starr & Associates, Inc.) about 7 years ago

Wordy.

"Confidential, classified information, regardless of content, should be treated with a healthy dose of respect"  

I totally agree, but were no longer talking about anything confidential!  I could see a restriction on insiders commenting on such things as it valuates it, but not reading what everyone else id, is draconian!

Bill

Posted by William J. Archambault, Jr. (The Real Estate Investment Institute ) about 7 years ago

Bill, if a person selectively releases 10 items out of X portfolio, an investigator would never assume they only have 10 items. An investigator would acknowledge the known releases, attempt to reverse engineer how they came to be in the possession of unauthorized personnel while searching every nook and cranny available for traces of every document available in that specific portfolio of information. The search gets expanded to every portfolio of information branching from the entity that suffered the security violation. Everyone known to have access will get investigated for inclusion or exclusion in/from prosecution. It is not draconian to attempt  to keep potential witnesses separated from the offenders by restricting account access and handing down a sequestering order. Judges tell jurists not to watch the news or read the papers so they don't have their memories tainted during a trial. Jurists don't get to read what everyone else is reading for a reason - so the accused can have a fair trail by a jury of his/her/their peers.

If having a copy of an unauthorized classified document is a crime, then restricting the curious from downloading it on the site actually helps the innocent workers from getting into trouble. An investigator will have to forensically examine the computers to determine the uploads and downloads. Every time you click a link your browser is downloading digital information and processing the packets so you can view it... What if a leak is from a script in the cookies? There is a bigger picture here...  

Posted by C Tann-Starr (Tann Starr & Associates, Inc.) about 7 years ago

C Tann...  Intelligence agencies regularlyrelease false info in order to affect markets and governments.  Lies can be as powerful as the truth... 

Another thing they do is release information that looks bad, and then blame the release on enemies...

Posted by Lane Bailey, Realtor & Car Guy (Century 21 Results Realty) about 7 years ago

Lane, very true, which is also a reason why we as writers have to be careful not to get dragged into virtual business way above our virtual pay grade. The twitter chatter is interesting because business people around the world are discussing the loss of revenue for the site and various governments not being pleased... The speculation is now shifting to the alleged encrypted insurance file... Is there a poison pill? Will there ever be a fair trial? Hmm...

Posted by C Tann-Starr (Tann Starr & Associates, Inc.) about 7 years ago

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/12/05/wikileaks-ready-release-massive-insurance-file-shut/

Posted by C Tann-Starr (Tann Starr & Associates, Inc.) about 7 years ago

Sorry Carolyn.

I only speak Midwestern and Far Western.

I don't understand calling something confidential when all the world has access! It was Confidential, classified information and may remain classified, but it's now confidential only to government workers and contractors. This order is absurd!

"Please do not attempt to access any of the WikiLeaks documents via the WikiLeaks website or through other websites hosting those documents because these documents may contain classified information."

This sounds stright from Red China or some persan kingdom, only despots fear already public information.

"restricting the curious from downloading it on the site actually helps the innocent workers from getting into trouble."  Maybe we should blind them?  What can we except from the party that barbecued the Davidans to save their children from a fate worse than death?

I'm all for hahging the spies!

Bill

 

Posted by William J. Archambault, Jr. (The Real Estate Investment Institute ) about 7 years ago

Bill, the original information was taken from corporations, governments, storage units/facilities which was private, confidential material NOT publicly available until they placed it on over 200 mirror sites to leak it to the public. You must remember that the FOURTH AMENDMENT [U.S. Constitution] states, "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

I am a person. I work for X. I send a cable. The secretary knows, the cable company knows, the routers that send my digital package have the encrypted information, the person who receives it knows. That is private information. If the college intern on the receiving end takes a flash USB drive and copies 16 gigs of information a day off of my hard drive every time they relieve me of my post so I can go to meal and passes it on for publication because he/she/they don't like the fact that (XYZ, insert any reason you please here), those actions do not make the cybercrime/physical theft issues moot. Receiving stolen property is a crime.

Amazon hosted their servers and Paypal processed their financial transactions. The site has lost those services because of their actions. If you were a hypothetical customer of the bank(s) they had unauthorized data from, would your attitude change if it were alleged that your company's financial transactions, e-mails, tax returns and TRW were being posted on-line as part of a 500,000 page chronological file to embarrass lending institutions and the government? If a website allegedly said in sum and substance we're releasing these files unredacted to show loan modifications are a possible scam and we have the hypothetical proof that less than 1% of eligible homeowners have received this benefit while XYZ had denied approximately 99% of applicants while taking a fee to process the application would you want your info included in there or feel better about it because the public should know? 

When it is not us specifically we sometimes don't feel the empathy and/or sympathy of what another person or entity is going through. This is our government having to adapt to a cybercrime that altered diplomatic relations with other countries and that is now consuming a significant amount of our investigative resources because of the extent of the breach in security. No one knows how much material they have... You do understand an enemy with a stolen launch code or date and time of a sensitive meeting could potentially kill off key political figures... Abraham Lincoln was shot in a theater. A forgotten, casual RSVP mentioned in an e-mail could be worth mad money to an enemy looking to whack a specific person. 

A bunch of classified/confidential 256-encrypted files on-line being downloaded that only require a published password is something everyone should be concerned about... Each file that gets unlocked triggers a global reaction. Get ready for new domestic/international laws and treaties to be written people...  The extradition negotiations on some of the people involved will probably prove to be very interesting... 

Posted by C Tann-Starr (Tann Starr & Associates, Inc.) about 7 years ago

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